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Tips and Tricks for Fundamentals of Soil Behavior Mitchell PDF Free Download.35


Fundamentals of Soil Behavior Mitchell pdf Free Download.35 invijai




Are you looking for a comprehensive and authoritative book on the physical properties of soil and the fundamentals of its behavior? Do you want to learn from the experts in geotechnical engineering who have decades of experience and research? Do you want to download the book for free without violating any laws or ethics? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this article is for you.




Fundamentals Of Soil Behavior Mitchell Pdf Free Download.35 invijai



In this article, I will introduce you to Fundamentals of Soil Behavior, a classic book written by James K. Mitchell and Kenichi Soga, two eminent professors in geotechnical engineering. I will explain what this book is about, who are the authors, why is it important for geotechnical engineering, and what are the main features of the book. I will also show you how to download the book for free from online sources, while being aware of the legal and ethical issues involved. Finally, I will conclude with a summary of the main points, some recommendations for further reading, and some FAQs.


Introduction




Soil is one of the most common and complex materials in nature. It is composed of various minerals, organic matter, water, air, and living organisms. It has different states and properties depending on its composition, structure, stress history, loading conditions, temperature, moisture content, and time. It exhibits various types of behavior such as elasticity, plasticity, viscosity, creep, consolidation, swelling, shrinkage, strength, failure, liquefaction, erosion, and more.


Understanding the physical properties of soil and the fundamentals of its behavior is essential for geotechnical engineering, which is the branch of civil engineering that deals with the design and construction of foundations, slopes, retaining structures, embankments, dams, tunnels, landfills, pavements, and other earthworks. Geotechnical engineers need to know how to characterize soil samples in the laboratory and in situ, how to interpret soil test results, how to model soil behavior using mathematical equations and numerical methods, how to design safe and economical structures based on soil parameters, how to monitor soil performance during construction and operation phases.


One of the best books that covers all these topics in depth is Fundamentals of Soil Behavior, written by James K. Mitchell and Kenichi Soga. This book was first published in 1976 by Wiley as a textbook for graduate students and researchers in geotechnical engineering. It was revised and expanded in 1993 as a second edition by Mitchell alone. In 2005, it was updated again as a third edition by Mitchell and Soga together.


What is Fundamentals of Soil Behavior?




Fundamentals of Soil Behavior is a book that provides a comprehensive and rigorous treatment of the physical properties of soil and the fundamentals of its behavior. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of soil mechanics, with an emphasis on the micro-mechanical behavior of soil particles and its influences on the macro-scale behavior. It also covers the time effects on soil deformation at different stress and strain levels, and the environmental and biological factors that affect soil behavior.


The book is divided into four parts: Part I introduces the basic concepts and definitions of soil mechanics, such as stress, strain, stiffness, strength, failure, and constitutive models. Part II discusses the physical properties of soil, such as composition, classification, state, and static and dynamic properties. Part III focuses on the micro-mechanical behavior of soil particles, such as interactions, bonds, fabric, structure, and influences on macro-scale behavior. Part IV deals with the time effects on soil deformation, such as creep, relaxation, consolidation, swelling, environmental and biological factors.


The book is filled with useful tables and graphs illustrating correlations among composition, classification, state, and static and dynamic properties. It also provides sets of questions and problems at the end of each chapter to test the understanding of the readers. It also includes references to the latest research papers and books for further reading.


Who are Mitchell and Soga?




James K. Mitchell and Kenichi Soga are two distinguished professors in geotechnical engineering who have made significant contributions to the field through their teaching, research, publications, and professional activities.


James K. Mitchell is a professor emeritus at Virginia Tech and a former professor at University of California Berkeley. He has a PhD in civil engineering from MIT. He is a pioneer in soil behavior research and has published over 300 papers and 10 books on topics such as clay mineralogy, soil fabric, electrokinetics, soil improvement, environmental geotechnics, unsaturated soils, and more. He has received many awards and honors for his work, such as the Terzaghi Lecture Award, the Rankine Lecture Award, the ASCE Karl Terzaghi Award, the ASTM Hogentogler Award, the ISSMGE Kevin Nash Gold Medal, and more. He is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Kenichi Soga is a professor at University of Cambridge and a former professor at University of California Berkeley. He has a PhD in civil engineering from University of Tokyo. He is an expert in soil behavior research and has published over 300 papers and 5 books on topics such as constitutive modeling, numerical analysis, laboratory testing, field monitoring, geosynthetics, geoenvironmental engineering, smart infrastructure, and more. He has received many awards and honors for his work, such as the Telford Gold Medal, the ICE Geotechnical Research Medal, the ASCE Arthur Casagrande Award, the ISSMGE Bright Spark Lecture Award, and more. He is also a fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers.


Why is this book important for geotechnical engineering?




This book is important for geotechnical engineering because it provides a comprehensive and authoritative source of information on the physical properties of soil and the fundamentals of its behavior. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of soil mechanics in depth and with clarity. It reflects the latest developments and advances in soil behavior research and applications. It helps students and professionals to learn from the experts in geotechnical engineering who have decades of experience and research.


This book is also important for geotechnical engineering because it bridges the gap between the micro-scale and macro-scale behavior of soil. It explains how the interactions and bonds among soil particles affect their fabric and structure, which in turn influence their macro-scale properties such as stiffness, strength, failure, and deformation. It also explains how time affects soil deformation at different stress and strain levels, which is crucial for long-term performance assessment of geotechnical structures. It also covers environmental and biological factors that affect soil behavior, such as temperature, moisture, chemicals, and microorganisms.


This book is therefore a valuable reference for geotechnical engineers who want to understand the physical properties of soil and the fundamentals of its behavior in depth and with rigor.


Main features of the book




In this section, I will describe the main features of the book in more detail. I will discuss the physical properties of soil, the micro-mechanical behavior of soil particles, and the time effects on soil deformation.


Physical properties of soil




The physical properties of soil are those that determine how soil behaves under different conditions, such as water content, temperature, stress, and time. They include texture, structure, bulk density, porosity, consistency, temperature, colour and resistivity. Composition and classification




Soil composition refers to the relative proportion of the three kinds of soil mineral particles, called soil separates: sand, silt, and clay. These are defined by their size ranges: sand is 0.05-2 mm, silt is 0.002-0.05 mm, and clay is less than 0.002 mm. Soil texture is determined by the percentage of sand, silt and clay in a soil sample. Soil texture affects the water-holding capacity, aeration, drainage rate, organic matter level, decomposition rate, warm-up in spring, compactability, susceptibility to erosion, shrink-swell potential, sealing ability, pollutant leaching potential, ability to store plant nutrients, and resistance to pH change of soil.


Soil classification is a system of grouping soils based on their physical and chemical properties. There are different systems of soil classification used in different countries and regions. One of the most widely used systems is the USDA textural classification triangle (see figure below), which divides soils into 12 classes based on their sand, silt and clay percentages. The only soil in which neither sand, silt nor clay predominates is called loam. Loam soils are considered ideal for crop production because they have a balanced combination of properties.


![USDA textural classification triangle](https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/71/Textural_Triangle.svg/1200px-Textural_Triangle.svg.png) State and static properties




Soil state refers to the condition of soil at a given time and location. It includes the moisture content, density, temperature, and stress of soil. Soil moisture content is the ratio of water mass to dry soil mass in a soil sample. It can be expressed as a percentage or a fraction. Soil moisture content affects the availability of water for plant growth and microbial activity. Soil density is the mass per unit volume of soil. It can be expressed as bulk density or particle density. Bulk density is the ratio of dry soil mass to total soil volume (including pores). Particle density is the ratio of dry soil mass to solid soil volume (excluding pores). Soil density affects the porosity, permeability, and compaction of soil.


Soil temperature is the measure of heat energy in soil. It depends on the solar radiation, air temperature, soil colour, soil moisture, soil cover, and soil depth. Soil temperature affects the biological, chemical, and physical processes in soil, such as seed germination, root growth, microbial activity, nutrient cycling, water movement, and thermal conductivity. Soil stress is the force per unit area applied on soil by external loads or internal forces. It can be normal stress or shear stress. Normal stress is perpendicular to the plane of interest, while shear stress is parallel to the plane of interest. Soil stress affects the deformation, strength, and failure of soil.


Dynamic properties




Soil dynamic properties are those that describe how soil responds to external forces or changes in state over time. They include elasticity, plasticity, viscosity, creep, consolidation, swelling, shrinkage, strength, failure, liquefaction, erosion, and more.


Elasticity is the ability of soil to recover its original shape and size after being deformed by an applied stress within its elastic limit. Plasticity is the ability of soil to retain its deformed shape and size after being deformed by an applied stress beyond its elastic limit. Viscosity is the resistance of soil to flow under an applied shear stress. Creep is the gradual and continuous deformation of soil under a constant stress over a long period of time.


Consolidation is the process of reduction in volume and increase in density of saturated clayey soils due to expulsion of water from pores under an applied load over time. Swelling is the process of increase in volume and decrease in density of clayey soils due to absorption of water into pores when load is removed or water content is increased. Shrinkage is the process of decrease in volume and increase in density of clayey soils due to loss of water from pores when water content is decreased.


Strength is the ability of soil to resist deformation or failure under an applied stress. Failure is the loss of strength or stability of soil under an applied stress. Liquefaction is the phenomenon of loss of strength and stiffness of saturated sandy soils due to increase in pore water pressure under cyclic loading, such as earthquakes. Erosion is the detachment and transport of soil particles by water, wind, ice, or gravity.


Micro-mechanical behavior of soil particles




The micro-mechanical behavior of soil particles refers to the interactions and bonds among soil particles and how they affect their fabric and structure, which in turn influence their macro-scale properties and behavior.


Interactions and bonds




Soil particles interact with each other through various types of forces, such as gravitational, electrostatic, van der Waals, capillary, and chemical forces. These forces can be attractive or repulsive, depending on the distance, orientation, and surface characteristics of the particles. The net result of these forces determines the degree of contact and cohesion among soil particles.


Soil particles can also form bonds with each other through various mechanisms, such as cementation, flocculation, and adsorption. Cementation is the formation of solid bridges between soil particles by precipitation of minerals from pore water, such as iron oxides, carbonates, silicates, etc. Flocculation is the aggregation of clay particles into larger units by electrostatic attraction or by bridging with organic molecules or cations. Adsorption is the attachment of molecules or ions from pore water or soil gas onto the surface of soil particles by physical or chemical forces.


Fabric and structure




Soil fabric refers to the spatial arrangement and orientation of soil particles and pores at the microscopic scale. It can be described by parameters such as shape, size, roundness, angularity, roughness, sphericity, and packing density of soil particles; and shape, size, continuity, tortuosity, and connectivity of soil pores. Soil fabric affects the physical and chemical properties of soil, such as porosity, permeability, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, and adsorption capacity.


Soil structure refers to the spatial arrangement and orientation of soil aggregates at the macroscopic scale